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the basis of successful design. “The green revolution must evolve without betraying the culture of the aesthetic project”, says Massimo Josa Ghini. A commandment very well observed and, hopefully, well received. Colour. Shining on sofas and armchairs, declined on chairs and transparent surfaces, fragmented in mosaics or displayed in an endless array of precious fabrics, colours take centre stage again: the use of rainbow tones is refined and sober, chic, often oneiric but always seducing. The Turner sofa by Hannes Wettstein for Molteni & Co., for instance, is in flaming red; Agatha Ruiz de la Prada signs happy carpets where her simple and funny signs are realized in cheerful tones; the Vegetal Chair by Roman and Erwan Bouroullec for Vitra is in a splendid green; Kartell has made its most recognizable trade mark of colourful plastic pieces, signed by top, while Moroso presents the lights, colours and allure of Africa through the works of designers from that Continent, who have proposed a new and enchanting idea of beauty - nourished by tradition, innovation, hope and (of course) a very personal use of hues. Style. If Prada has chosen Seoul to inaugurate Transformer, a visionary creature by Rem Koolhas, numerous fashion brands have relied on the Milanese Salone to present the novelties of their home collections, or to strengthen their connections with the world of design. Versace hosts Emotional refractions: three pieces (a dormouse, a lamp and a table) where the shiny crystal structure is completed by silk, leather and velvet, to communicate a strong tactile identity enhanced by the sculptural lightness of the material. Rigour in shape and luxury of materials for Fendi, too, which with the project Craft Punk involved ten young creators to use the brand’s waste materials (leather, buttons...) to create new installations. Antonio Marras presents his flock of poufs on the

premises of the newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore, designed by Renzo Piano: inspired both by the Kenzo Pagodon bag and by his Sardinian background, the designer has focused on identity, risk and experimentation. Music and rock for the first (and very much acclaimed) home collection by Diesel, which features very strong and innovative pieces produced by Moroso and Foscarini, while Paul Smith has selected colourful flowered fabrics and Missoni gave free reign to its famous colour palette for pieces like the Cordula chaise longue. Milan Vukmirovic has introduced his geometric, refined pieces for Trussardi, while Armani has opted for limited editions and precious details. Tradition and innovation. Richard Ginori (Italy’s most historic porcelain manufacture) asked designer Paola Navone to create a lounge dominated by the one-of-a-kind pieces of its centuries-old archives, alternated to the contemporary one-of-a-kind proposals where new and eclectic visions are clearly recognizable. Faraway, distant suggestions come from the seas painted by Michelangelo Pistoletto on six Leggera armchairs by Blumer for Alias. Transparency. The need to breathe in new air is clearly visible in the wide use of glass, crystal and transparent plastic: not only for chandeliers or lamps, like the Opus Circular by Lolli & Memmoli, but also for tables, chairs, bookshelves. Fabio Novembre, for instance, designed the table Fleur, with multi-colored petals sustaining a transparent plan, for Kartell; the Capriccio table by Jacopo Foggini for Edra is a spectacular play on reflection between the glass plan and the sinuous steel base; Marc Newson reinvented the famous Atmos clock by Jaeger-LeCoultre with a boule of glass by Baccarat. Outdoor. Every wall hides a possibility: the house of the future is made of interconnected spaces. This trend towards a very

close relationship with nature (as epitomized by the forest-houses projected by Stefano Boeri) is emphasized by the success of pieces of furniture that can easily be placed either in a room or in a garden, or terrace: like the Road by Roda, designed by Rodolfo Dordoni, the Intrecci armchair by Emu, the proposals of Eugeni Quitlle for Driade or Eden, the maxi-sofa in aluminium by Unopiù. Light. In synergy with the Salone, the XXV edition of Euroluce took place, a biannual appointment where 525 brands presented their latest creations and faced the interlocutory thematic of ecology and sustainability. From the use of LED to the emerging trends for lamps on a big scale, the transversal trends have been “dream” and “geometry”, and they have given birth to the most spectacular and beautiful creations of the whole Salone. The fairy-tale, dreamlike attitude of Raggi finds a magnificent declination in the Vanderbilt chandelier for Barovier & Toso; the Cosmic Leaf lamp by Ross Lovergrove for Artemide has been universally acclaimed as one of the most beautiful pieces presented; Ingo Mauer created an installation called Fisherman’sTears. Geometry and futuristic functionality distinguish Nozzle by Modular Design, Spore by Massimo Iosa Ghini and Chignon by Piero Russi for Fontana Arte, while the geometric shapes of K-Ray (designed by Philippe Starck for Flos), of Itis (by Naoto Fukasawa for Artemide) and of Tattoo by Marco Piva for La Murrina evoke a clean, refined world dominated by lightness and functionality - without giving up style and personality. The luminous cloud by Cerith Wyn Evans, suspended over the Triennale Museum, clearly indicated how, two sides of the same coin, imagination and technique are the impossible to separate.

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Profile for Fondazione Cologni dei Mestieri d'Arte

Artigianato 73  

An amazing magazine from italian arts&crafts.

Artigianato 73  

An amazing magazine from italian arts&crafts.

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