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In questa pagina: casula di Marisa Bronzini, menzione speciale. This page: the chasuble by Marisa Bronzini, special mention.

Liturgical vestments: current trends

The competition to define a new chasuble, officially opened in concurrence with the XI edition of Koinè, and intended to stimulate new ideas in the sacred vestments sector, lays the foundations for innovation. During the post-conciliatory years (from 1965 to date), new attitudes towards liturgical vestments arose among the Italian clergy, and we have also witnessed some degree of evolution in the types and models of vestments themselves. In the immediate postconciliatory period and throughout the 1970s, there was a widespread feeling of unease regarding the use of traditional vestments, and there were even radical instances of secularisation, bringing the very existence of these vestments themselves into question. Subsequently, during the 1980s, opinions definitively settled in favour of the chasuble, abandoning the planet, and there was a rekindled interest in the historical heritage of liturgical vestments and the development of new ideas, in a strictly simplified key. In short, we could say that during the post-conciliatory years, most of the Italian clergy has expressed a certain desire for renewal in the liturgical vestments used. By and large, it was perceived that in the complex context of the Council’s renewed liturgy, the vestments themselves can play either positive or negative role. This perception was, however, not sufficiently expanded upon, neither by the majority of Italian liturgists, nor by the vestment producing sector. The competition for a new chasuble, organised in concurrence with Koinè, was based on these considerations. To achieve realistically

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stimulating results for production, albeit not transferable directly to the market, designers are not asked to create new models of chasuble, but, rather, to reinterpret existing ones. An extensive annexe to the announcement of the competition (of which we have included a summary below), provides participants ample information regarding models, colours and decoration. Symbols signs, images, figurations. The beauty and nobility of the vestments must be expressed more in the forms and materials used, than in the richness of the decorations. The hackneyed repetition of clichéd iconography is no longer acceptable, as is the recourse to the inclusion of additional elements, such as the so-called ‘orphreys’, which are but a further impracticality in a noble vestment that is in itself already essential. The current mood suggests widening our research into new materials and fabrics.

Colour The differences in colour in sacred vestments serve to express the particular characteristics of the mysteries of the faith celebrated, and to convey an impression of Christian life as it proceeds through the liturgical year. Traditional colours, with only a few changes, will continue to be used for sacred vestments. Materials In addition to traditional fabrics, both natural and man-made fibres may be used in the creation of sacred vestments, providing that they are appropriate for the dignity of the liturgical rite. Shape The chasuble is a form of cloak, and may assume a variety of different shapes. It may be semicircular, known as a ‘cloak’ shape, elliptical, with shortened sides, known as a ‘medieval’ shape, or it may be elliptical with further shortened sides.

Profile for Fondazione Cologni dei Mestieri d'Arte

Artigianato 58  

Italian Magazine about crafts

Artigianato 58  

Italian Magazine about crafts

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