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STYLE ICONS:

MUMFORD & SONS Four smartly-dressed young men in their early twenties, Mumford & Sons are the epitome of stylish

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t all started in 2007 when these West Londoners started to create music that would propel them to international stardom two years later. And it wasn’t just their heartfelt lyrics and powerful sound that caught the attention of the masses. Attire so sharp and effortlessly worn, Marcus Mumford, Country Winston, Ben Lovett and Ted Dwane have become style icons. At Glastonbury in 2009, the band played to 300 people on the Greenpeace stage. A year later the foursome walk onto to the John Peel stage with what can only be thousands of fans, packed tightly as sardines in a tin, as far back as the eye can see. Front man Marcus Mumford tells the crowd “This has been the year of our lives” before his voice is rendered inaudible by an enormous rapture of cheers and screams from the sea of sardines. And it truly

has been. Mumford & Sons debut album ‘Sigh No More’ quickly gained momentum from its October 2009 release in the UK with regular airtime on radio stations and rave reviews across the UK and Ireland with BBC Radio One DJ Zane Lowe naming their first single ‘Little Lion Man’ the “hottest single in the world” that same year. When it comes to their style, Mumford & Sons embrace the crisp and clean look with vintage clothes, like collarless shirts, suspenders and vests. Their ragged and worn, sometimes even theatrical-looking garments serve to further captivate and enhance the powerful lyrics which are delivered in Mumford’s raspy, almost distraughtsounding voice. While synonymous with other and somewhat equally stylish artists such as Laura Marling and Johnny Flynn, Mumford & Sons are certainly leading the way in terms of well-turned out young men.

Threadbare  

Prototype folk music magazine

Threadbare  

Prototype folk music magazine

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